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‘We’re supposed to be a first-world country’—ER doc exposes what’s happening at a NY hospital

The war with COVID-19 has arrived on our soil, and those on the front lines are being sent into battle without enough armor or armaments.

We’ve spent weeks watching hard-hit nations struggle under overwhelming conditions—countries like Italy, which has more hospital beds and more doctors per capita than the U.S.—having to make heartbreaking decisions about which patients will get ventilators and which patients will die.


The picture of what happens when healthcare systems—even developed, well-managed systems—get hit with more critically ill patients than they have room or equipment for, is stark. And that reality has just begun to play out in the U.S.. Not enough personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep healthcare workers from contracting the virus they’re surrounded by in the hospital. Not enough ventilators to meet the swelling demand.

Heroic doctors and nurses on the front line are beginning to give us all a glimpse of what this battle looks like. ER doctor Colleen Smith in Elmhurst, Queens, shared with the New York Times what is happening inside her hospital, where 13 patients died of COVID-19 in one day. The hospital has had to place a refrigerated truck outside to hold the deceased bodies. She says their ER patient load has more than doubled in recent days, and those numbers are likely to increase.

“Leaders in various offices, from the president to the head of Health and Hospitals ,saying things like, ‘We’re going to be fine. Everything’s fine.’ And from our perspective, everything is not fine,” Dr. Smith told the Times. “I don’t have the support that I need, and even just the materials that I need, physically, to take care of my patients.”

Another doctor called what’s happening in the hospital “apocalyptic.” Hearing Dr. Smith detail the overwhelming anxiety and daunting reality at the very beginning of the expected surge in cases should make us all realize the seriousness of what we’re facing and understand why flattening the curve is so important.

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Disneyland may be closed but you can now take a stunning virtual tour with these videos

For even the most casual fan of Disney theme parks, the news that Disneyland, Walt Disney World and every other Disney park and resort worldwide is shuttered during the coronavirus crisis has come as a shock.

Before coronavirus, it was easy to complain that prices were too high, crowds were too big, and the weather was too hot. But now that we know Disney parks are off limits, they beckon more than ever. The good news: Coronavirus doesn’t mean you can’t visit a Disney theme park. No, you won’t be able to go there in person. But even without a Magic Band or a FastPass, you can spend an hour or two inside your favorite Disney theme park (or even discover one you’ve always longed to visit).


That’s because super-committed Disney fans have long been creating “walkthrough” videos of Disney theme parks and posting them on YouTube. These aren’t short edits, either, but longform, high-quality videos that capture one moment in time – a moment you can relive whenever you want.

For Disney fans who have been less than pleased with some recent changes (for instance, the transition of Disney California Adventure’s Tower of Terror into the Guardians of the Galaxy ride), walkthrough videos even make it possible to see earlier, now-vanished incarnations of the parks that don’t exist anymore.

Photo by Brandi Ibrao on

So, head over to YouTube, put on a pair of mouse ears, grab some sunscreen (to help complete the effect) and take a virtual visit to Disney theme parks.

Here are some great places to start when it comes to taking a tour of the wide Disney world without leaving your home:

  • Disneyland – The original and, by the measure of some enthusiasts, still the best. This walkthrough from 2013 showcases the park’s smaller, more intimate surroundings, though there are segments (like New Orleans Square at 15:00) that showcase the park’s extreme attention to detail beautifully – with almost no crowds. At about 16:40, you’ll start hearing some clicking. That’s the sound Walt Disney’s dedication to Disneyland being sent in Morse code.


YouTube

www.youtube.com

  • Disney California Adventure – The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror and A Bug’s Land live on in this video shot in 2016, during a Southern California winter’s morning (hence the low sun and long shadows). This super-steady walkthrough does make you wish you could crane your neck to look up, but is otherwise a great way to stroll through the park and hear the background sounds.


Disney California Adventure Tour Walkthrough All The Park, Disneyland

www.youtube.com

  • The Magic Kingdom – Once you get through the heavy holiday-season morning crowds on Main Street, Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom is gloriously uncrowded in this 34-minute walk through the most popular theme park in the U.S.


Magic Kingdom 2016 FULL 4K Walkthrough | Holiday 2016 + Mickey’s Birthday | FL Attractions 360

www.youtube.com

  • EPCOT – No Disney park is going to experience more changes than EPCOT, which is really like two theme parks (Future World and World Showcase) in one. All Disney theme parks take on a special feel at night, which is particularly true for EPCOT, and this video from 2013 captures that feel – and this enormous park – evocatively.


Epcot at Night 2013 – Future World, World Showcase, Illuminations – Walt Disney World

www.youtube.com

  • Disney’s Hollywood Studios – Captured just after the opening of Galaxy’s Edge but before the Chinese Theater had reopened with Mickey and Minnie’s Runaway Railway, this video captures the Big Band sounds of the park and its distinctive flavor.


Disney’s Hollywood Studios 2019 (Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Included), Orlando | Full Walkthrough Tour

www.youtube.com

  • Disney’s Animal Kingdom – While it skips the Oasis entry area of the park, this leisurely walkthrough of Disney’s meticulous nature park is as rich and relaxing as the park itself, taking time to explore its ever-changing foliage and the fine detail.


Long Relaxing Stroll at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in 4K 60fps – No Narration – Walt Disney World

www.youtube.com

That’s just the start. Enthusiastic Disney fans have also helped capture background music tracks from Disney theme parks around the world. For instance, want to spend the day inside but feel like you’re at EPCOT? There’s a full hour of the music that follows you throughout Future World here:


Epcot Innoventions Plaza Area Loop (Old)

www.youtube.com

You can even turn your own bedroom (or any room) into a Disney resort hotel room – a one-hour video of “WDW Today,” the information-and-music channel that plays in every resort room is here:


WDW Today Channel – January 2019 – New Music!! | Walt Disney World Resort TV

www.youtube.com

There are many more videos to be found – this is just a sampling. It’s never going to be a complete substitute for actually being there, but given that these videos come without crowds, humidity, high prices and heat, it’s possible that in some ways they’re even better than the real thing.

John Singh is a writer and entertainment-industry veteran who began his career as a newspaper journalist and has also worked at Disney, Lucasfilm Ltd., DreamWorks Animation and on a variety of films and TV series.

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Dr. Usama Riaz gave everything he had to fight COVID-19. The world should know his name.

Dr. Usama Riaz is being hailed as a hero In Pakistan for courageously putting his life on the line to treat patients with COVID-19. Even though the 26-year-old doctor didn’t have adequate protective gear, he kept fighting for his patients until he eventually lost his life to the disease.

He’s a hero in Pakistan but the world should know his name.

Riaz was part of a ten-person team screening pilgrims who recently returned to Pakistan from Iraq and Iran. He later treated these patients at isolation centers in Gilit, in Pakistan-administered Kashmir.


Last Friday, after treating his patients, Riaz went to bed but couldn’t get up in the morning. He was rushed to a military hospital for a CT scan but the equipment didn’t work. He was put on a ventilator and died two days later.

“It is with extreme sadness that the Gilgit-Baltistan health department confirms that Usama Riaz who played a key role in the war against coronavirus has passed away,” the Gilgit Baltistan government tweeted on Monday.

“Usama proved himself the real hero by sacrificing his life to save others,” Gilgit Baltistan Information Minister Shams Mir said. Riaz will be declared a national hero.

Its believed that Riaz contracted the coronavirus because he didn’t have access to proper protective equipment. Other doctors in Pakistan have also contracted the disease for the same reason.

Even though Riaz knew he was in danger of catching the virus, it didn’t stop him from working to save the lives of his patients.

via Sheromalik / Twitter

There are over 1,000 documented cases of COVID-19 in Pakistan and the number has tripled over the past week. Healthcare specialists believe the country may become a hotbed for the virus due to its underdeveloped healthcare system.

“We’re on a very low scale, in terms of infrastructure,” Dr Shamail Daud, a healthcare management specialist, said according to Al-Jazeera. “Healthcare is very disintegrated and not very high in terms of quality or dealing with high levels of critical care for patients, which is unfortunately an outcome of COVID-19.”

“Pakistani medical officials are calling on the government to provide more protective gear to doctors so they don’t have to suffer the same fate as Riaz.

“We request the government to immediately provide us personal protection equipment,” Dr. Asfandyar Khan, president of staff at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences in Islamabad, told a news conference on Friday, according to Reuters.

“It is like suicide to treat patients without protection,” he added. “If infection spreads in hospitals believe me no person will be ready to touch any patient.”

On Friday, Lt. Gen. Muhammad Afzal, the chief of Pakistan’s national disaster management department, said the country has procured 12,500 pieces of personal protective equipment and it will be sent to hospitals.

However, the country also has a shortage of ventilators. In severe cases, COVID-19 patients suffer inflammation and fluid in the lungs which makes it difficult for them to breathe and to oxygenate their blood.

“We have 1,700 ventilators in public hospitals and another 600 in the private sector,” said Afzal, who said the country has put in an order for 800 more.

Riaz is an incredible example of the lengths that healthcare workers will go to help their patients in a crisis. He gave everything to help his patients, it’s a shame that his government didn’t take preventative measures to help care for him.

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How well is your community social distancing? This website grades states and counties.

Are people in your community being vigilant about the social distance measures we’re being asked to practice?

If you just peer out your windows or walk around your neighborhood, it’s hard to get an accurate gauge. Perhaps that close group of people you see is a family who lives together getting some fresh air, or maybe they’re friends rebelliously gathering in public. The two guys you saw smoking off the same joint and then shaking hands with a random person on the street (true story) could be indicators of widespread ignorance, or they may just be a few fluke fools.

Unfortunately, it will be weeks before we can determine by infection numbers how well our social distancing measures have worked. But in the meantime, we have data that can give us an idea of how well people are following the directives to stay home and away from other people as much as possible.

Unacast is a company that uses smartphone GPS and mapping tools to track human activity for various data usage. (The founders originally wanted to find out where people went to concerts so they could create a better user experience for their music-streaming service in Norway.) And thanks to the ubiquity of cell phones with GPS and no one reading the fine print on where that information goes, they’ve created a tool to track whether or not people are socially distancing the way they should be.

To simplify the data, they’ve created an interactive map that’s updated daily called the Covid-19 Social Distancing Scoreboard. According to how people’s movement changes, they give each state and county a letter grade to let people know how social distance measures are being followed.

The county-specific information is helpful, especially in large states. My state gets a nice solid B, for example, but my county gets a big old F. Lovely.

Unacast.com

One thing that keeps coming up in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic is the need for data. Who has the virus? Where are they located? How long have they been contagious? Who have they been in contact with?

Without data, we are flying blind. And though social distancing is just one piece of the puzzle, having a data-driven picture of where people are practicing it and where people aren’t can help us know where we need to get the word out and perhaps even where to look for potential hot spots in the near future.

Click here to access the interactive map and see how social distancing is going in your community.

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50-something-year-old dad impresses the masses with an adorable dad-daughter dance battle

As the U.S. slogs through the second week of widespread social distancing, many of us are feeling the impact of cabin fever and near-constant family togetherness. For many families, the past 10 days have felt like a combo of “Yay, more quality family time!” and “OMG, more social distance in this house, please.”


We’re also all looking for bright lights of joy in the midst of all the pandemic uneasiness and uncertainty and the Starkey family in Denver, Colorado has provided some of that joy this week.

Chris Starkey posted a video to Facebook on Monday of himself and his daughter Brooklyn doing a dance-off to Flo Rida’s “Low”—and it’s unexpectedly awesome. Starkey wrote, “My daughter challenged me to a dance off and said I don’t have it anymore. See that closet in the back she is still crying in it!!!” So much silly shade thrown around in this family, it’s delightful.

When you see their fun banter and Starkey’s middle-aged-man moves, you’ll see why the video has been shared more than 280,000 times in two days. Starkey wrote in a comment that the reaction has brought tears to his eyes and encourages everyone to “Give back to your community” right now. He also says another video will be coming on Monday.

Excellent. We need this kind of levity right now more than ever.

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Italian engineers’ brilliant 3-D printed hack turns scuba gear into ventilator masks

One of the biggest issues in treating those affected by COVID-19 is a lack of medical equipment. Italy, the country second hardest-hit by the pandemic, has faced shortages in equipment and hospital beds.

This puts doctors in the terrible position of having to decide who gets treatment and who does not.

One of the most important tools in the fight against COVID-19 are ventilators.


“A ventilator is a fairly fancy piece of technological equipment which is designed to breathe for somebody who is unable to breathe effectively on their own,” David Hill, a pulmonologist who sits on the board of the American Lung Association, said according to PBS.

In severe cases of COVID-19, a patient’s lungs become inflamed and filled with fluid which makes it difficult for them to breathe and oxygenate their blood.

A ventilator could mean the difference between life and death.

Due to the shortage of ventilator masks in northern Italy, a doctor reached out to Cristian Fracassi and Alessandro Romaioli, engineers at Isinnova, a 3-D printing company, with the idea of making masks out of scuba equipment.

In just three hours, the engineers created a prototype for a 3-D printed valve that successfully converts the scuba gear into a ventilator mask.

“We had never made valves before, but we wanted to help,” they said according to The Independent.

The engineers then reached out to French sporting goods retailer Decathlon to see if they could use the Subea Easybreath snorkeling mask for the project. The company was “immediately willing to cooperate.”

The first fully-working prototype was tested at the Chiari Hospital and proven to be effective. After the successful test, the engineers printed 100 more valves.

The engineers quickly patented the valve, but then made the 3-D printing files free so anyone with a printer can produce them during the crisis. “We clarify that our initiative is totally non-profit, we will not obtain any royalties on the idea of the link, nor on the sales of Decathlon masks,” the engineers said.

The valves cost about a dollar to make according to The Independent.

via Cristian Fracassi / YouTube

While the engineers are proud of their success in creating the ventilator masks, they stress they are just a stop-gap solution.

“We are reiterating that the idea is designed for healthcare facilities and wants to help in realization of an emergency mask in the case of a full-blown difficult situation, where is not possible to in find official healthcare supplies,” the engineers said.

Neither the mask nor the link are certified and their use is subject to a situation of mandatory need,” they continued. “Usage by the patient is subjected to the acceptance of use of an uncertified biomedical device, by providing a signed declaration.”

The engineers at Isinnova are a fantastic example of the powerful ways that out-of-the-box thinking combined with partnerships between healthcare and outside industries can help us get through the pandemic.

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Youth activist rallies for gender equality in Rwanda

This story was originally shared on #EqualEverywhere — a campaign to champion the changemakers working to make equality for girls and women a reality. You can find the original story here.

Irene Irere, a youth activist living in Musanze city in northern Rwanda, is committed to eliminating gender-based violence and preventing pregnancy among young girls. She participates in a youth club connected to Huguka Dutore, a youth workforce initiative operating in her country. Irene understands from her own life the importance of having links to jobs and self-employment, entrepreneurship training and coaching, and access to financing, family planning, and reproductive health services.

What does #EqualEverywhere mean to you?

For me, #EqualEverywhere means women and men can be treated equally at home, in their communities, in schools, and at work. Many people perceive this statement differently based on their culture, interests, and faith. To me, #EqualEverywhere means to treat women and men equally and respect their natural differences.

Why do you advocate for equal rights for girls and women?

I started advocating for equal rights for girls and women after seeing the harm gender-based violence was inflicting in my community. As an African living in Rwanda, it is common to say that men are more powerful than, or superior to women. Certain people assume women cannot contribute to community development. Because of this, women continue to face different forms of violence, including marital abuse. The main issue is young girls below 18 years impregnated by older men, something I strongly advocate against. Awareness of this touched me deeply and led me to push for policies to ensure such men are seriously punished. However, some families cover up for men who impregnated young children and claim it is taboo to prosecute them through the courts.


What motivates you to do this work?

I am highly motivated by the progress my advocacy is making in my home community. In fact, before I started, the pregnancy rate among young girls was high. Then, over the past year, 200 fewer were reported. This progress motivates me to continue my work.

What are the main challenges you experience in your work to advance gender equality?

As I push ahead, I face daily challenges. First, I am a girl, which means that some people in my community, even leaders, might consider my voice to be irrelevant. For example, someone might discount the ideas I express during a meeting by stating that I am merely conveying a woman’s perspective. Also, we still [experience] gender violence in daily life. For example, I might need a service and be asked for sex before getting what I requested.

What progress are you seeing as a result of your work?

More positively, Rwanda is closing the inequality gap between men and women by steadily appointing more women to leadership positions. This has made a great impact, because, among other things, women and men are having an equal chance to attend any school. Also, gender-based violence has declined and the number of women taking jobs that in the past were only filled by men has risen. In fact, before this wave of progress, the number of girls able to attend universities, especially those wanting to pursue science, was very small, but now their numbers are increasing.

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Co-parenting in the coronavirus pandemic: A family law scholar’s advice

As millions of people around the world practice social distancing and self-quarantine, they are separating themselves from everyone but their immediate family members. However, for divorced or separated parents who share custody of their children, the definition of “immediate family” isn’t obvious.

Already, family lawyers around the country are being inundated with calls from anxious parents worried about returning children to co-parents who are not willing to practice social distancing. They are contemplating keeping their child away from the other parent, in violation of a shared-custody agreement – but wonder how courts will react.


I have been a family law professor for almost 13 years. I have written numerous articles about custody and visitation. Until recently, I never even contemplated how these traditional family law concepts might change in response to a pandemic. Few custody and child-support court orders will have provisions covering how to share parenting in a pandemic – although they may become common in the future.

This is uncharted legal territory. The federal government, many states and even municipal governments around the country have declared states of emergency.

With many family courts closed, divorced or separated parents will have to make up arrangements as they go along. My strong advice is that parents should not try and equate the COVID-19 pandemic with other types of emergencies that may be covered in their custody agreements.

Instead, they should seek to work together – however difficult that may be – to provide for the best interests of their children, and to preserve a sense of fairness and equity, both emotionally and legally, however custody is shared.

Finding common ground

As workplaces shut down or convert employees to working from home, many parents may find opportunities to adjust schedules so the child can be cared for by one parent or the other, rather than bring in the care of sitters, nannies or members of the extended family.

Public health experts say it’s best to limit social circles to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

Parents should try to be a team in this situation, even if it is difficult. This is not the time to keep a minute accounting of how many overnights the other parent has had or to argue that the current school closures should be treated like summer vacation. Avoid gamesmanship.

Talk through concerns and be open to new arrangements. Reassure the other parent that any current reduction in their parenting time will be made up – eventually – and that in the meantime, they will have increased phone calls, video chats and other forms of non-physical contact.

I do recommend keeping records, including contacting the other parent in writing (by text or email), explaining what your concerns are about the current custody plan, and proposing a reasonable solution. It will be very helpful to encourage the other parent’s thoughts and suggestions on the proposal. Any coronavirus custody arrangement should accommodate the concerns and interests of both parents.

It is stressful for everyone – parents and children alike – to live through this pandemic. Children don’t need the added worry of parental fights. They badly need more stability and reassurance – especially about their contact and connection with those who love them the most.

Judges look out for the kids

It may not be easy to come to agreement. Every relationship – and ex-relationship – is different. Some couples may be used to sorting things out in court. That is less possible now than during normal times.

Most family courts are closed for everything but emergency matters, which almost certainly do not include custody disputes. Of course, after the crisis passes, the courts will reopen.

At that time, I have little doubt that judges will be pleased with parents who have worked together to identify their children’s best interests, and taken steps to protect their health and safety. And I expect judges will be furious at parents who put their own interests before their children’s, and refused to cooperate with a willing and reasonable parent.


images.theconversation.com

Disobeying a court order is a big unknown

If agreement is really impossible, the path gets much more precarious. Shared-custody agreements and orders were crafted when the present crisis was unimaginable, but violating them is risky – even if the reason sounds solid. Judges may reduce visitation and custody for parents who interfere with their ex-partner’s custodial rights.

Parents who fear for their children’s health may be willing to take their chances and hope that when this is all over, the family court will agree that their decision was reasonable. It is a big gamble – and regardless of the outcome is likely to involve significant legal expense and time fighting in court.


images.theconversation.com

Seeking help to settle disputes

There are alternatives to conflict and animosity, and waiting for courts to reopen and sort things out.

Many family court mediators remain available to help couples work out pandemic related custody issues. Although the specific circumstances of the coronavirus pandemic are unprecedented, parental disputes about children’s health and safety are common. Mediators are well versed in these issues and can help families reach reasonable agreements.

Mediated agreements – even attempts at agreements – provide a contemporary and largely objective record of the parents’ thoughts, circumstances and concerns. That record may help judges sort out who was being reasonable and accommodating in seeking custody changes, and who was not.

In the effort to stem the spread of the coronavirus, Americans are repeatedly reminded that the decisions they make today will have direct consequences on our individual and collective well-being in the future. This warning is not specifically directed at divorced or separated parents, but it is just as applicable.

The custody choices parents make in the next few weeks affect not only the immediate health and welfare of their children and families, but may also affect their future custody arrangements. Courts rarely look kindly on parents who put their needs before their children’s. In the aftermath of a pandemic, it safe to assume this will be even more true.

The circumstances surrounding many custody disputes have changed drastically in the past week, but as always, the safest bet is cooperation.

Marcia Zug is Professor of Family Law, University of South Carolina

This article originally appeared on The Conversation. You can read it here.

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Sikh volunteers prepare 30,000 free meals for people in isolation

If you know anything about Sikhism, this news will not surprise you. If you don’t, you’re about to learn about a religion with a long history of humanitarianism.


Sewa, or “selfless service” is a way of life for Sikhs. It means helping others with no expectation of anything in return or hope of gain in any way. Through sewa, Sikhs demonstrate the equality of all people, show love and respect towards others, and protect themselves from selfish vices.

And during a time of global crisis, sewa from everyone is more needed—and appreciated—than ever.

Knowing the impressive capacity for service in the Sikh community, the New York Mayor’s office reached out to New York Sikhs with a request for food packages. The Sikh Center of New York kicked it into high gear, preparing and packaging more than 30,000 home-cooked vegetarian meals for Americans currently self-isolating.

Beans, lentils, and rice were cooked in humongous pots before being served into to-go containers to be distributed to elderly and immunocompromised people in isolation. Strict food hygiene practices were observed, and social distancing measures practiced as much as possible during the food preparation.

“The meals were prepared on Sunday and was packaged and loaded for delivery, ” Himat Singh, coordinator of American Gurudwara Prabhandak Committee (east coast) told Asian News International (ANI). “The distribution starts on Monday in the morning, by local authorities. Volunteers who prepared and packaged the meal had a medical check and have been approved by physicians and health authorities.”

Sikh communities across the nation have stepped up to help out their neighbors.

“Once we heard people were having a problem with food when they go shopping, they can’t find food in the shopping center, then we started reaching out to people in our personal capacity in the Bay Area.” Dr. Pritpal Singh, coordinator of American Gurudwara Prabhandak Committee (west coast) told ANI.

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion founded in India in the 15th century. There are about 27 million Sikhs in the world. More than three quarters live in the state of Punjab, India. Approximately 500,000 Sikh live in the U.S., primarily in California, New York, and Washington state—all hard-hit areas in the coronavirus outbreak.

Many thanks to the Sikh community for your sewa during this time.


Coronavirus: Sikhs prepare over 30,000 free meal packets for Americans in self-isolation

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The spring break teen who wouldn’t let the coronavirus ‘stop me from partying’ has sobered up and apologized

Brady Sluder, the SoundCloud rapper who proudly partied his butt off for spring break in Florida last week, seemed right out of central casting.

Ever defiant with his backwards hat and midday cheap beer buzz, he told a reporter the coronavirus wasn’t going to get between him and a good time.

“Whatever happens, happens. If I get corona, I get corona,” Sluder with total sincerity. “At the end of the day, I’m not going to let it stop me from partying.”


After all, this party was a long time coming so he was going to fight for his right to be there when it happened.

“I’ve been waiting, we’ve been waiting for Miami spring break for a while,” he added. “About two months we’ve had this trip planned, two, three months, and we’re just out here having a good time.”

Sluder unintentionally became the spokesperson for the thousands of twenty-somethings and teens that partied on the beach in south Florida while most of the country was either winding down their activities or on total lockdown.

The partiers became the source of national scorn and embarrassment for not adhering to the nationwide call to practice social distancing.

If Sluder’s decision to put partying before his health only affected him, then there’d be no real reason to get too mad at the kid. But that’s not how the coronavirus works. Sluder and the rest of the spring breakers were at risk of contracting the disease and then unknowingly spreading it back home.

After being shamed by most of the planet, Sluder has come out and apologized.

“Don’t be arrogant and think you’re invincible like myself,” the spring breaker wrote on Instagram. “I wasn’t aware of the severity of my actions and comments.”

He spoke to the danger that can happen when young people refuse to practice social distancing.

“Like many others, I have elderly people who I adore more than anything in the world and other family members who are at risk, and I understand how concerning this disease is for us all,” he said.

“Our generation may feel invincible, like I did when I commented,” he added. “But we have a responsibility to listen and follow the recommendations in our communities.”

Sluder’s post begs an important question: Why do young people think they’re invincible?

The answer is their brains aren’t completely developed. This is especially true for men.

Young people’s brains are still in a process of neuronal myelination, which is a fancy way of saying that the frontal lobe isn’t completely connected to the rest of the brain. This process is usually complete in women by the age of 25, but men go through it until they are 30.

So guys like Sluder are able to party in a danger zone with zero worries because their brains are underdeveloped. Dumping a bunch of alcohol into the mix doesn’t help things much either.

“Essentially, your frontal lobes tell you that it’s a bad idea to drink alcohol and drive or to ignore the consequences of taking heroin,” Gary L. Wenk Ph.D. wrote in Psychology Today.

“When your frontal lobes finally complete their process of myelination, they begin to work properly and you stop doing dangerous things,” he continued. “Most importantly, you stop feeling immortal.”